Space to Think: A Process for Revising Fiction

Space to Think: A Process for Revising Fiction

Contributing writer Savanah Burns wrote this article on the process of revision. The featured image was taken by Lionel Gustave.

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Coming and Going: “The Geometry of Wishes” by Randall Watson

Coming and Going: “The Geometry of Wishes” by Randall Watson

Contributing writer Savanah Burns wrote this post in celebration of Randall Watson’s new book with Texas Review Press.

Everything has a place and time in life, and then life goes on, right? This is what nature warns us with the changing of the tree leaves. But in our own lives, the special and the ordinary moments in life come too fast and go too quickly. Those moments you didn’t know would be important until later on, such as when you first fall in love. And those moments you knew would change everything, such as the day your lover leaves. Read more

TRP at AWP

TRP at AWP

Contributing writer Laura Brackin writes about her time at AWP 2018.

Every year, the Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) organizes a literary conference which draws thousands of people: authors, editors, journals, students, graduate and residency programs, presses, and people who simply love books. In the span of three days, hundreds of panels are set up, ranging in topics which cover such things as writing in the LGBTQ community, what to do with your MFA degree after graduation, how writers become editors, and many more. A conference goer could easily schedule a panel for every hour in each day, if they wanted to. Read more

Not all Nonfiction is Creatively Equal: A Look at Reading Nonfiction

Not all Nonfiction is Creatively Equal

Contributing writer Laura Brackin writes about nonfiction and how it is different from fiction, in terms of how a fiction reader should approach it.

Readers of fiction look for specific things in the literature they choose: well-voiced narration, dialogue that isn’t forced or seemingly “scripted,” proper grammar and punctuation, tension and urgency that keep the pages turning, and realistic characters who are well-developed and working to get themselves either out of trouble or closer to the desired object/situation/event.

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Four Insights into Writing Children’s Literature

Four Insights into Writing Children’s Literature

Contributing writer Savanah Burns wrote this post offering advice on writing children’s literature.

When it comes to writing “good” children’s literature, there are a few things authors have done well. First of all, the author needs to know their reader. Second of all, the author needs to successfully engross their reader in the narrative. Read more

Facebook: Not just for keeping up with the family

Facebook: Not just for keeping up with the family

Contributing writer and social media intern Elizabeth Evans continues a series of posts for authors on working various social media sites and using them to promote their work. The second in the series is on the platform Facebook.

Facebook has been a part of our daily lives since 2006. Facebook is so prevalent in our society that it’s become a verb in our daily vernacular (ex “I’m Facebooking right now”). 45% of American adults said in a Pew Research survey that they get news from Facebook, with 50% of users surveyed saying they get news solely from Facebook. Read more

Making a Lie Count: Developing Dialogue that Matters

Making a Lie Count

Contributing writer Savanah Burns wrote this post offering advice on writing convincing dialogue for your characters.

I had a friend once tell me that it is weird how we can never really know someone because we are not them, we are not omniscient, and we are not omnipresent. Yet, through our limited lens, we feel as though we know someone. Often, people are more than what we perceive. So, when we talk to them, there are countless things that go unsaid. So, what is left unsaid? How about someone’s lies, motives, secrets, and the truth? Read more

Exercising the Writing Muscle

Exercising the Writing Muscle

Contributing writer Laura Brackin gives some advice and tips on how to continue developing your writing skills and getting in that daily writing practice.

Professionals don’t become great in their specialty because they made As in school. While this helps them become the professionals they want to be, developing their skills doesn’t stop once they receive their diploma. Read more

Accepting Rejection

Accepting Rejection

Contributing writer Savanah Burns wrote this post offering advice on how to accept rejection in the world of writing.

A former creative writing professor of mine once explained said that she received a small card, no bigger than a business card, in the mail. On this little card, were the words, “Your submission was not accepted.” Read more